Nineteenth-century History

Old Daguerreotypes

While browsing the internet the other day, I ran into a very interesting collection put together by The Library of Congress of some of the oldest known daguerreotypes in the United States. Some of the images include buildings in Washington DC while others are portraits of people and occupations.

The White House in 1846

The White House in 1846

The website has an abundance of information about the collection and about the creators of the daguerreotypes. You can also see some of the collection which has been digitized and posted to their website.

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