Nineteenth-century History

Nineteenth Century German History

Wappen des Deutschen Reichs

The German imperial coat of arms.
Source: Wikipedia

Despite having just begun another series, I am going to be embarking on a second multi-part series which has to do with nineteenth century German history. The goal of the project will be to give a survey of nineteenth century German history.

You may ask why I am going to be pursuing such a project on a blog about American history, but the answer is two-fold. First of all, I enjoy German history quite a bit and so I find this project to be different and extremely interesting all at the same time. Secondly, I will be undertaking this project for a history class which I am currently taking.

That being said, I hope you enjoy this project and can learn something about German history. You will be able to find all of the entries either on the Nineteenth Century German History project page or in the category of the same name.

One Comment
  1. Isa alifio
    March 25, 2019 1:43 pm 

    Very intreresting all the people

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