Nineteenth-century History

Pictures of Jesse and Frank James’ Houses

I recently returned from a trip to Missouri to visit the family farm. It is always incredibly interesting going back there because my grandmother is really interested in our family history and the history of the area in general. As part of this most recent visit, we visited the houses of the James brothers near Clinton, MO.

I’ve taken a couple of pictures of their houses and have posted them here for you to see:

Jesse James' house near Clinton, MO

Jesse James' house near Clinton, MO

Jesse James' house near Clinton, MO

Jesse James' house near Clinton, MO

Frank James' house near Clinton, MO

Frank James' house near Clinton, MO

Frank James' house near Clinton, MO

Frank James' house near Clinton, MO

The houses are across the street from each other. Standing, facing Jesse James’ house, you literally turn around 180 degrees and you see Frank James’ house. There was also apparently a tunnel dug between Jesse James’ house and the barn that would have been used to get away. The barn that was there during Jesse’s time is no longer there, but the modern garage pictured in the second pictures is apparently roughly where it stood.

15 Comments
  1. July 23, 2009 8:01 pm 

    Thank you! Great pictures.

  2. July 23, 2009 8:17 pm 

    Thanks! Glad you like them.

  3. July 24, 2009 9:02 am 

    Don’t know what they looked like back in their day, but they’re beautiful properties today.

  4. July 24, 2009 9:56 am 

    I agree. They are both private homes still today. I’m glad the current owners are maintaining the properties.

  5. Ashley
    September 21, 2009 10:27 pm 

    I love that this blog is here. I’m from Clinton, and have actually been past these places many times…and decided for a poetry class to write something about the history of Clinton. Great stuff.

  6. November 25, 2009 8:33 am 

    I lived in Franks house back in early 80’s as a child. My father was a contractor and renovated most of the house as original. They traded the house to a local Family from clinton who did not like all the historic and many original lighting fixtures,so my father offered to swap them out with the discount lights out of their house and he probably still has many of the original items from the house. Jesse’ house was in fairly poor shape at that time but looks to be nice now.

  7. Connie Jones
    March 11, 2011 6:15 pm 

    I have a “tin type” ( I think ) photo of two men, standing, on a rock outcrop over a fast moving river. There appears to be central-eastern mountain terrain with a bridge or train trellis in the far background. The men are dressed in up-scale, mid to late 1800’s narrow lapel jackets with vests, Bollas, and knee high riding boots. They have mustaches and appear to be related. One is older and taller. I wonder if this could be Frank and Jesse. I have seen photos of the brothers, but never with just mustaches. Could this river be near Clinton ?

  8. Roxanne
    November 19, 2011 8:42 pm 

    I used to live in Frank’s house. It was a fun place to grow up!

  9. March 31, 2012 2:52 am 

    I have lived in “Frank’s” house for the past 11years. We truly enjoy living here & enjoy hearing all the stories. Glad to have found this site.

  10. March 31, 2012 6:39 pm 

    Thanks for the comment! I’ve been by the house a couple of times and I always enjoy seeing it!

  11. jed rogers
    April 23, 2013 7:50 pm 

    I had the opportunity go take a tour of Jessie’s home in back in the ’90s.

  12. Roxanne
    January 31, 2014 5:00 am 

    I lived in Frank’s house as a child, but I think you should edit this post. These are not Frank and Jessie James’ homes, they were built and lived in by Frank and Wal Bronaugh. Although, the James’ brothers were frequent guests–and I know lots of stories about them being on the property–they aren’t technically James’ homes.

  13. Jeremy W Holt
    April 13, 2018 6:32 am 

    Is this page still maintained?? if so let me know i would love to talk to you and tell you a little story about the North House or Frank James House.

  14. Valorie
    January 4, 2019 4:33 am 

    My grandfathers parents house was next door to where the boys grew up. Getting research 2019 and history docs.

  15. Amanda R
    June 23, 2019 7:19 pm 

    Was curious where you found your info about these being james’ houses? I cannot find anything to support this. Thanks

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