Nineteenth-century History

Kings of Bavaria

Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Bavaria

Coat of Arms of the Kingdom of Bavaria
Source: Wikipedia

This multi-part series will feature all of the Bavarian kings which ruled between the collapse of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806 and the fall of the Kingdom of Bavaria after World War I in 1918. Although the Kingdom of Bavaria did not actually last all that long (just over a century), it had some colorful figures as monarchs which left a lasting impression on Bavaria even to this day. This series will provide biographical information as well as interesting facts about each monarch.

1: Series Announcement

2: King Maximilian I Joseph

3: King Ludwig I

4: King Maximilian II Joseph

5: King Ludwig II

6: Prince Regent Luitpold

7: King Otto I

8: King Ludwig III

9: Conclusion – After the Fall of the Monarchy

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