Nineteenth-century History

How Railroads took the ‘Wild’ out of the West

While I’m finishing up some other articles for History Rhymes (such as the 5th installment of the “Who were the real cowboys?” series…finally), I found a good article about how the railroads took the wild out of the wild west. It was a very interesting read actually about the development of the railroads in the west and the element of stability and civilization it brought to the previously uncivilized west.

The article is from HistoryNet.com and can be found here: http://www.historynet.com/how-railroads-took-the-wild-out-of-the-west.htm.

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