Nineteenth-century History

Biography on Jesse and Frank James

This is a very interesting show done on the James brothers, Jesse and Frank. You can either view it on Hulu or view it here:

2 Comments
  1. May 13, 2009 11:41 am 

    I enjoyed the video, especially the latter section about Bob Ford. My great grandfather, Jefferson Randolph “Soapy” Smith knew Ford in Creede, Colorado 1892. One of “Soapy’s” men, Joe Palmer, shot up the town in a drunken “hoo-rah” one evening. I was able to point to Soapy’s saloon in the photograph of Creede the video displayed.

    It was written by friends of both Smith and Ford that the two men were not Fond of, perhaps even hated, one another. When Ford was shot dead on June 8, 1892 it was rumored that Soapy had a hand in the deed, however this was never substantiated.

  2. May 13, 2009 6:03 pm 

    It was quite a good video actually. I believe you had a similar, if not the same, photo of Creede in one of your blog posts, didn’t you?

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