Nineteenth-century History

Remains of Civil War Solider Found

The remains of a Civil War Union Solider were found in Franklin, Tennessee by work crews digging a sewer line. Here is the full article:

FRANKLIN, Tenn. — Construction crews digging a sewer line made a historic discovery in Franklin on Thursday.

While digging near a Burger King restaurant at the corner of Columbia Pike and Southeast Parkway, the body of a Civil War Union soldier was uncovered.

The remains of the soldier were found scattered in a 2-foot grave.

Curators and historians from the Carter House and Lotz House arrived at the location to analyze the body. Bones and well-preserved buttons were recovered from the site.

State archaeologists will take the remains to a lab and then have them reburied.

An estimated 2,000 soldiers were killed in the Battle of Franklin, which took place in November 1864.

The original article.

2 Comments
  1. May 16, 2009 5:27 pm 

    I wonder if it will be possible (via DNA or other means) to identify the individual and inform his family.

  2. June 6, 2009 1:32 am 

    I don’t know. That would be quite interesting to be able to do though.

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