Nineteenth-century History

Wyoming Territorial Prison Museum

Wyoming Territorial Prison

Wyoming Territorial Prison

The semester is finally over for me. I had my last final and had to turn in my last paper yesterday. The paper was an interesting paper, however, because it involved the history of the Wyoming Territorial Prison Museum. It wasn’t about this history of the prison itself, but rather of the site as a museum. The research we did was original research. One of the requirements for the paper was to conduct an oral interview with a person who has been involved somehow with the administration of the museum at some point since it became a museum in 1990.

My interviewee was originally supposed to be a lady who has worked there (and still continues to work there) since the early nineties. Unfortunately I was unable to get ahold of her in time, so I ended up interviewing my professor who was involved with evaluating a couple of grants for the Prison Museum, reviewing a script for a movie that was to be made about the prison and is even currently serving on the Master Planning Committee for the Prison Museum.

As the first oral history interview I’ve ever done, I think it actually went rather well. The interview will be archived at the American Heritage Center at the University of Wyoming for future reference.

Post a Comment

Your email is kept private. Required fields are marked *

*
*

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Explore History Rhymes
Random Featured Articles
The Role of Prince Albert in the Monarchy

The Role of Prince Albert in the Monarchy

In the first two decades of Queen Victoria’s reign, there was no one who played a more influential role in British affairs as Prince Albert, the Prince Consort. Upon the ascension of Queen Victoria to the throne, the state of the Monarchy was already in question.1 After his subsequent marriage to ...
Rocky Mountain Mining Towns: Bannack, Montana

Rocky Mountain Mining Towns: Bannack, Montana

The first part of the new series about mining towns in the Rocky Mountains will begin with Bannack, Montana. Nothing, but a ghost town now, Bannack was the site of a major gold discovery in 1862. The town was founded the same year as a result of the discovery and is named after the local...
Who were the real cowboys? (Part 3)

Who were the real cowboys? (Part 3)

The image of the American cowboy as we perceive it today was created in the 19th century, particularly in the postbellum period, or the period after the Civil War. After the war, many soldiers from both the Union and the Confederate sides had difficulties finding jobs in the east despite the South&#...
Houses in Fin-de-Siècle Britain: Conclusion

Houses in Fin-de-Siècle Britain: Conclusion

Fin-de-Siècle Britain saw many new styles and innovations in the architecture of houses. Some of these new designs were visual whilst others were more practical. A mishmash of styles were created by a number of different architects in an attempt to redefine British architecture, but they would effe...