Nineteenth-century History

Introducing: The Old Journal

Coronation of Queen Victoria by John Martin

Coronation of Queen Victoria by John Martin

As a lot of my readers know, I have a very strong interest in Victorian British history as well as the history of the American west. Because of this, I’ve decided to create a new blog which will focus only on Victorian British history. The new blog is called The Old Journal.

I’ve decided to create a separate blog because I want History Rhymes to remain focused on the history of the American West. This way, those that are interested in the history of the west can read History Rhymes and those who are interested in Victorian history can read The Old Journal. If you are interested in both, you can read both. Recent posts from each blog are located in the bottom of the sidebar of the other blog.

I hope you enjoy the two blogs and I look forward to hearing from my readers at both places!

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