Nineteenth-century History

News

First World War Officially Ends

I read something really interesting in the news today that I thought I would share here. According to the British newspaper, Telegraph, the First World War is finally coming to an end today. This past weekend, Germany made it’s final payment for the war and thereby finally cleared the debt giv...

19th Century Books from the British Library

According to The Times, the British Library is currently undertaking a project to digitize their collection of more than 65,000 nineteenth century books in an effort to preserve them and make them available for free for public consumption. The only catch is that you must own an Amazon Kindle which i...

New Theme

I’ve decided it was time to update the look of History Rhymes to something a bit more professional-looking. This new theme I chose, called Lightword is a modern theme that supports the features of WordPress 2.9 which is what powers History Rhymes. The old theme did not support all of the new f...

New Domain

Today I registered an actual domain for History Rhymes! From now on, History Rhymes will be available at https://www.historyrhymes.info. You will not need to update your RSS feeds or anything as that will automatically be taken care of. The blog will also still be available at the old URL, so you re...

Remaining Romanov Bones Found

I know this has nothing to do with American history, but I thought I would add an entry about it anyway since I found it interesting. The History Blog is reporting that the remains of the two missing children of Tsar Nicholas II have been found. The bones belong to Tsarevich Alexei and Grand Duchess...

New Photos of Lincoln’s Second Inauguration

This evening I was browsing a few different history sites and on one of them, AmericanHeritage.com, I ran into an interesting article about new photos of President Lincoln’s second inauguration that were miscataloged at the Library of Congress. They were discovered by Carl Jennings of Berthoud...
Explore History Rhymes
Random Featured Articles
The Scofield Mine Disaster

The Scofield Mine Disaster

The day of May 1, 1900 started off as any other ordinary day for the miners in Scofield, Utah. Early in the morning, the men and boys kissed their wives and mothers good-bye as they left for a hard day’s work in the mines. Later in the day was to be festivities celebrating May Day,...
Nineteenth Century German History: Consequences of the Fall of the Holy Roman Empire (1806-1848) – Part 2

Nineteenth Century German History: Consequences of the Fall of the Holy Roman Empire (1806-1848) – Part 2

Part 1 of “Consequences of the Fall of the Holy Roman Empire (1806-1848)” Less than ten years after the fall of the Holy Roman Empire and after Napoleon was sent into exile after his defeat by the British, a congregation of monarchs and statesmen gathered together in Vienna in order to r...
Nineteenth Century German History: Consequences of the Fall of the Holy Roman Empire (1806-1848) – Part 1

Nineteenth Century German History: Consequences of the Fall of the Holy Roman Empire (1806-1848) – Part 1

The fall of the Holy Roman Empire in 1806 had drastic consequences for nineteenth century German history. For about a millennium a loose conglomeration of several different semi-autonomous German-speaking kingdoms under the Latin name of Sacrum Romanum Imperium 1 had controlled a vast region in Cent...
Kings of Bavaria: King Maximilian I Joseph

Kings of Bavaria: King Maximilian I Joseph

King Maximilian I Joseph of Bavaria, also known as King Max I Joseph, was the very first king of Bavaria. His reign marked the beginning of a kingdom which lasted for just over a century. Born on May 27, 1756 in Schwetzingen in what is today Baden-Württemburg, Maximilian came from the Palatine line...